lecture2

Lecture2 - Crashing decisions have been made Labs this week Website gauchospace.ucsb.edu Bedrock principles that have nothing to do with math

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
± Crashing ± decisions have been made ± Labs this week! ± Website ± gauchospace.ucsb.edu ± Bedrock principles that have nothing to do with math ± Populations and samples ± Types of research ± Types of variables ± What are statistics? ± Set of tools, vocabulary, and symbols for communicating about data ± Permits one to: ± organize, summarize, present, and interpret information ± Theory about decision making ± How to make judgments when one is uncertain
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
± There are two main branches of statistics ± Descriptive Statistics ± Tools for summarizing data ± Tables & graphs ± measures of central tendency ± measures of variability ± Inferential Statistics ± Data from a sample is used to draw inferences about a population ± Tools for generalizing beyond actual observations (from a sample to a population) ± Population ± The set of all individuals of interest ± Does not have to be humans (could be tires, bears, bugs) ± Doesn²t have to be a big group ± Sample ± A set of individuals selected from a population ± Usually intended to represent the population ± There are two main sources of data ± Political polls ± Population: All voters ± Sample: The individuals polled ± US University Undergraduates ± Population: Students at US universities ± Sample: UCSB undergraduates
Background image of page 2
± We need to know how to tell the difference between when we are talking about populations and samples ± Parameter ± Any characteristic coming from a population (e.g., the average) ± Usually denoted by a Greek character ± Statistic ± Any characteristic coming from a sample ± Usually denoted by an English character ± Although we typically deal with information coming from a sample, we usually want to know something about a population ± Because populations are usually too big to completely characterize we have to rely on samples ± This is tricky business because of ± Sampling error ±
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course PSYCH 5 taught by Professor Collins during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

Page1 / 10

Lecture2 - Crashing decisions have been made Labs this week Website gauchospace.ucsb.edu Bedrock principles that have nothing to do with math

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online