Rational Exponents

Rational Exponents - Rational Exponents and Roots If x is...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Rational Exponents and Roots
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
If x is positive, p and q are integers and q is positive, In other words, when you have a rational exponent, the denominator of that exponent is your index or root number and the numerator of the exponent is the exponential part. I have found it easier to think of it in two parts. Find the root part first and then take it to the exponential part if possible. It makes the numbers a lot easier to work with. Radical exponents follow the exact same exponent rules as discussed in Tutorial 2: Integer Exponents. In that tutorial we only dealt with integers, but you can extend those rules to rational exponents. Here is a quick review of those exponential rules: Review of Exponential Rules
Background image of page 2
Example 1 : Evaluate . View a video of this example * Rewrite exponent 1/2 as a square root We are looking for the square root of 49 raised to the 1 power, which is the same as just saying the square root of 49. If your exponent's numerator is 1, you are basically just looking for the root (the denominator's
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 9

Rational Exponents - Rational Exponents and Roots If x is...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online