2-1-11 - Pseudo-instructions These are easy-to-use assembly...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Pseudo-instructions These are easy-to-use assembly language instructions that do not have a direct machine language equivalent. During assembly, the assembler translates each psedudo- instruction into one or more machine language instructions. Pseudo-instructions enrich the instruction set, and make programming easier. Example move $t0, $t1 # $t0 ! $t1 (pseudo-instruction) The assembler will translate it to add $t0, $zer0, $t1 Consider the new instruction slt $s1, $s2, $s3 (set less than) if $s2 < $s3 then set $s1 to 1 Now, there is a pseudo-instruction blt $s0, $s1, label The assembler translates this to slt $t0, $s0, $s1 # if $s0 < $s1 then $t0 =1 else $t0 = 0 bne $t0, $zero, label # if $t0 " 0 then goto label Loading a 32-bit constant into a register Quite often, we would like to load a constant value into a register (or a memory location) lui $s0, 42 # load upper-half immediate ori $s0, $s0, 18 # (one can also use andi) What is the end result? What is the end result?...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/18/2011 for the course 22C 060 taught by Professor Ghosh during the Spring '11 term at University of Iowa.

Page1 / 9

2-1-11 - Pseudo-instructions These are easy-to-use assembly...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online