Haviland Ch 15 - Chapter15 ProcessesofChange ChapterPreview...

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Chapter 15 Processes of Change
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Chapter Preview Why Do Cultures Change? How Do Cultures Change? What Is Modernization?
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Why Do Cultures Change? Much change is  unforeseen , unplanned, and  undirected.  Changes in existing values and behavior may  also come about due to  contact with other  peoples  who introduce new ideas or tools.  This may even involve the massive   imposition of foreign ideas and practices  through  conquest  of one group by another. 
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What Is Modernization? Modernization  refers  to a process of change  by which traditional, nonindustrial societies  acquire characteristics of technologically  complex societies. Accelerated modernization interconnecting all  parts of the world is known as  globalization .
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How Do Cultures Change? The mechanisms of culture change include: Innovation  is the discovery of something that is then  accepted by fellow members in a society. Diffusion  is borrowing something from another group. Cultural loss  is the abandonment of an existing  practice or trait, with or without replacement. Acculturation  is a massive change that comes about  due to contact with a more powerful, group. 
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Innovation The ultimate source of change: some new  practice, tool, or principle. Primary innovations are chance discoveries  of new principles. Secondary innovations are improvements  made by applying known principles. Examples in your culture?
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Acceptance of Innovation Depends partly on its perceived superiority to  the method or object it replaces.  Also connected with the prestige of the  innovator and recipient groups. Any examples of unaccepted change in your  culture?
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Innovation A Hopi Indian woman firing pottery vessels. The earliest  discovery that firing clay vessels makes them more durable took  place in Asia, probably when clay-lined basins next to cooking  fires were accidentally fired.  Later, a similar innovation took  place in the Americas.
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Once one’s reflexes become  adjusted to doing something  one way, it becomes difficult  to do it differently.  Thus, when a North   American visits one of the  world’s many left-side drive   countries (about sixty) such 
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course ANTH 100 taught by Professor Juliedavid during the Fall '09 term at Orange Coast College.

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Haviland Ch 15 - Chapter15 ProcessesofChange ChapterPreview...

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