Haviland Ch5 PPT - Chapter 5 Language and Communication...

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Chapter 5 Language and Communication
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Chapter Preview What Is Language? How Is Language Related to Culture? How Did Language Begin?
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What Is Language? A system for the communication, in symbols, of any kind of information. Through language, people share their experiences, concerns, and beliefs and communicate these to the next generation.
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How Is Language Related to Culture? Without our capacity for complex language, human culture as we know it could not exist. Age, gender, and economic status, may influence how people use language. People communicate what is meaningful to them, and that is largely defined by their culture.
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How Do Languages Change? Languages are constantly transforming— new words are adopted or coined, others are dropped, and some shift in meaning. Languages change for various reasons: selective borrowing by one language from another the need for new vocabulary to deal with technological innovations or altered social realities.
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Language A system of communication using sounds or gestures that are put together in meaningful ways according to a set of rules. A signal is a sound or gesture that has a natural or self-evident meaning.
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Language and Orangutans Orangutans have an insightful, humanlike thonking style characterized by longer attention spans and quiet deliberate action. Orangutans make shelters, tie knots, recognize themselves in mirrors, use one tool to make another, and are the most skilled of the apes in manipulating objects. Chantek – in your text
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The Nature of Language There are approximately 6,000 languages. All languages are organized in the same basic way. Spoken languages use sounds and rules for putting the sounds together. Sign languages use gestures rather than sounds.
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Linguists and Fieldwork For linguists studying language in the field, laptops and recording devices are indispensable tools. Here Tiffany Kershner of Kansas State University works with native Sukwa speakers in northern Malawi, Africa.
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Descriptive Linguistics The branch of linguistics that involves unraveling a language by recording, describing, and analyzing all of its features.
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Linguistics The study of all aspects of language: Phonetics Phonology Morphology Syntax Grammar
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Phonology The study of language sounds. Phonetics
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course ANTH 100 taught by Professor Juliedavid during the Fall '09 term at Orange Coast College.

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Haviland Ch5 PPT - Chapter 5 Language and Communication...

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