Cellularrespiration

Cellularrespiration - Cellular Respiration Cellular...

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Cellular Respiration
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Cellular Respiration A cellular process that requires oxygen and gives off carbon dioxide The energy released during the conversion of glucose to carbon dioxide and water is used to synthesize ATP. Usually involves breakdown of glucose to carbon dioxide and water Energy extracted from glucose molecule: Released step-wise Allows ATP to be produced efficiently Oxidation-reduction enzymes include NAD + and FAD as coenzymes
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Glucose Breakdown: Summary Reaction
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Glucose is broken down into two 3- carbon pyruvic acid molecules. This part of cellular respiration takes place in the cytosol and is called glycolysis.
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Figure 3.28 Figure 3.28
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3.4 Metabolism - Chemical Reactions in the Body Electrons are given up by glucose as it is converted to pyruvic acid. These electrons are transported by electron carriers such as nicotinamide  adenine dinucleotide  ( NAD ).
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Electrons are given up by glucose as it is converted to pyruvic acid. These electrons are transported by electron carriers such as nicotinamide  adenine dinucleotide  ( NAD ).
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NAD + NAD + (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) Called a coenzyme of oxidation-reduction it can Oxidize a metabolite by accepting electrons Reduce a metabolite by giving up electrons Each NAD + molecule used over and over again NAD serves as a taxicab for electrons. The empty taxicab (NAD + ) picks up electrons; the full taxicab (NADH) carries electrons, drops them at their destination, and releases a hydrogen atom and an
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NAD + Cycle
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FAD FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide) Also a coenzyme of oxidation-reduction Sometimes used instead of NAD + Accepts two electrons and two hydrogen ions (H + ) to become FADH 2
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Cellular Respiration:Overview of 4 Phases 1.Glycolysis: a.Occurs in cytoplasm b.Glucose broken down to two molecules of pyruvate c.ATP is formed 2.Transition reaction: a.Both pyruvates are oxidized b.Electron energy is stored in NADH c.Two carbons are released as
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1.Citric acid cycle: a. Electron energy is stored in NADH and FADH 2 b.ATP is formed 1.Four carbons are released as CO 2 2.Electron transport chain: a. Extracts energy from NADH & FADH 2 b.Produces 32 or 34 molecules of ATP
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14 Glycolysis
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course BIO 100 taught by Professor S.sanchez during the Spring '10 term at Orange Coast College.

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Cellularrespiration - Cellular Respiration Cellular...

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