Lect.11Vascularsysteminplants

Lect.11Vascularsysteminplants - Nutrition and Transport in...

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Nutrition and Transport in Plants
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2 Outline 1. Essential Inorganic Nutrients Soil Formation Soil Profiles Soil Erosion 3. Transport Mechanisms Water Organic Nutrients
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3 Plant Nutrition and Soil Essential Inorganic Nutrients About 95% of a plant’s dry weight is carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Fertilizers have N, P, and K Primary nutrients are carbon dioxide and water Essential nutrients (~16 elements) have identifiable role, and a deficiency causes a plant to die Macronutrients needed in large amounts (9) Micronutrients needed in much smaller amounts
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Overview of Plant Nutrition
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Nutrient Deficiencies
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Examples of deficiencies Phosphorus ->causes dark green or purple leaves in seedlings Iron yellowed leaves but veins are green. Similar symtoms in Mg deficiencies
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Soils have distinct layers Roots extract water and mineral nutrients from soil. Soil consist of small particles of rocks & clay minerals mixed with decaying organisms and organic molecules Soil also houses bacteria, fungi, protist, and animals.
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Soil formation begins with weathering of rock Soil formation begins: Rocks disintegrate into soil The texture of the soil depends on the size of these particles Clay particles are the smallest Soil Formation
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The smaller the particles have higher surface area to volume ratio thus higher water holding capacity Soil scientist use the relative amounts of sand, silt, and clay to classify soils i.e. Sandy soil coarse particles Silty soils have finer ones
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Nutritional Function of Soil Soil is a mixture of: Soil particles Decaying organic material Living organisms Air, and Water Roots take up oxygen from air spaces Soil particles consist primarily of Sand Clay Silt
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Soil develops in layers: Litter (soil surface) dead, decomposing leaves and stems Microorganisms release most Carbon in decaying as CO 2 Some Carbon remains in the upper layer
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Lect.11Vascularsysteminplants - Nutrition and Transport in...

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