solution for introduction t0 probability and statistics 13th edition

Solution for introduction t0 probability and statistics 13th edition

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Exercices tirés du livre Introduction to probability and statistics 13th edition de Mendenhall, Beaver et Beaver. STT1700 (Automne 2009) Chapitre 1: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 1.8, 1.11, 1.13, 1.14, 1.18, 1.19, 1.25, 1.26, 1.30, 1.33, 1.39, 1.41, 1.51, 1.61, 1.67, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.8, 2.21, 2.24, 2.26, 2.37, 2.38, 2.42, 2.47, 2.51, 2.54, 2.55, 2.65, 2.79, 2.80, 3.11, 3.16, 3.39. 1: Describing Data with Graphs 1.1 a The experimental unit, the individual or object on which a variable is measured, is the student. b The experimental unit on which the number of errors is measured is the exam. c The experimental unit is the patient. d The experimental unit is the azalea plant. e The experimental unit is the car. 1.2 a “Time to assemble” is a quantitative variable because a numerical quantity (1 hour, 1.5 hours, etc.) is measured. b “Number of students” is a quantitative variable because a numerical quantity (1, 2, etc.) is measured. c “Rating of a politician” is a qualitative variable since a quality (excellent, good, fair, poor) is measured. d “State of residence” is a qualitative variable since a quality (CA, MT, AL, etc. ) is measured.
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1.3 a “Population” is a discrete variable because it can take on only integer values. b “Weight” is a continuous variable, taking on any values associated with an interval on the real line. c “Time” is a continuous variable. d “Number of consumers” is integer-valued and hence discrete . 1.5 a The experimental unit, the item or object on which variables are measured, is the vehicle. b Type (qualitative); make (qualitative); carpool or not? (qualitative); one-way commute distance (quantitative continuous); age of vehicle (quantitative continuous) c Since five variables have been measured, this is multivariate data. 1.8 a-b The variable “survival time” is a quantitative continuous variable. c The population of interest is the population of survival times for all patients having a particular type of cancer and having undergone a particular type of radiotherapy. d-e Note that there is a problem with sampling in this situation. If we sample from all patients having cancer and radiotherapy, some may still be living and their survival time will not be measurable. Hence, we cannot sample directly from the population of interest, but must arrive at some reasonable alternate population from which to sample. 1.11 a-b The experimental unit is the pair of jeans, on which the qualitative variable “state” is measured. c-d Construct a statistical table to summarize the data. The pie and bar charts are shown in the figures below. State Frequency Fraction of Total Sector Angle CA 9 .36 129.6 AZ 8 .32 115.2 TX 8 .32 115.2
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32.0% TX 32.0% AZ 36.0% CA State Frequency TX AZ CA 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 e From the table or the chart, Texas produced 825 0 .32 = of the jeans. f The highest bar represents California, which produced the most pairs of jeans. g Since the bars and the sectors are almost equal in size, the three states produced roughly the same number of pairs of jeans.
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course CSCI 300 taught by Professor Orlicki during the Spring '11 term at IT Tallaght.

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Solution for introduction t0 probability and statistics 13th edition

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