acctquiz2 chap 2 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
If you are thinking of purchasing  Best Buy  stock, or any stock, how can you decide what the stock is  worth? If you manage  J. Crew 's credit department, how should you determine whether to extend  credit to a new customer? If you are a financial executive of  IBM , how do you decide whether your  company is generating adequate cash to expand operations without borrowing? Your decision in  each of these situations will be influenced by a variety of considerations. One of them should be your  careful analysis of a company's financial statements. The reason: Financial statements offer relevant  and reliable information, which will help you in your decision making. In this chapter we take a closer look at the balance sheet and introduce some useful ways for  evaluating the information provided by the financial statements. We also examine the financial  reporting concepts underlying the financial statements. In Chapter  1  you learned that a balance sheet presents a snapshot of a company's financial position at  a point in time. The balance sheet in Chapter  1  listed individual asset, liability and stockholders'  equity items in no particular order. To improve users' understanding of a company's financial  position, companies often use a classified balance sheet. A  classified balance sheet  groups together  similar assets and similar liabilities, using a number of standard classifications and sections. This is 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
useful because items within a group have similar economic characteristics. A classified balance sheet  generally contains the standard classifications listed in Illustration  2-1 . These groupings help readers determine such things as (1) whether the company has enough assets to  pay its debts as they come due, and (2) the claims of short- and long-term creditors on the company's  total assets. Many of these groupings can be seen in the balance sheet of Franklin Corporation shown  in Illustration  2-2 . In the sections that follow, we explain each of these groupings.
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Helpful Hint Recall that the accounting equation is Assets = Liabilities + Stockholders' Equity. CURRENT ASSETS Current assets  are assets that a company expects to convert to cash or use up within one year or its  operating cycle, whichever is longer. In Illustration  2-2 , Franklin Corporation had current assets of  $22,100. For most businesses the cutoff for classification as current assets is one year from the  balance sheet date. For example, accounts receivable are current assets because the company will  collect them and convert them to cash within one year. Supplies is a current asset because the 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course ACCOUNTING 1 taught by Professor Sweat during the Spring '11 term at Georgia Perimeter.

Page1 / 64

acctquiz2 chap 2 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online