Chapter 26.pe - Chapter26 NarcoticsandAntimigraineAgents

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Chapter 26  Narcotics and Antimigraine Agents
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Pain Definition Sensory and emotional experience associated with  actual or potential tissue damage  Drugs used to relieve pain Narcotics: opium derivatives used to treat many types  of pain Antimigraine drugs: reserved for the treatment of  migraine headaches
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Neural Pathways of Pain
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Gate-Control Theory of Pain
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Location of Opioid Receptors CNS Nerves in the periphery Cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract
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Narcotic Agonists Actions Act at specific opioid receptor sites in the CNS  Produce analgesia, sedation, and a sense of well-being Indications Relief of severe acute or chronic pain Analgesia during anesthesia Pharmacokinetics  IV most reliable way to achieve therapeutic response IM and Sub-Q rate of absorption vary Hepatic metabolism and generally excreted in the urine and  bile Cross placenta
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Narcotic Agonists (cont.) Contraindications Known allergy Pregnancy, labor, and lactation Diarrhea caused by poisons Cautions Respiratory dysfunction GI or GU surgery Acute abdomen and ulcerative colitis Adverse reactions Respiratory depression with apnea Cardiac arrest
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Narcotic Agonists (cont.) Adverse reactions (cont.) Shock Orthostatic hypotension Nausea, vomiting, and constipation Biliary spasm Dizziness, psychoses, anxiety, fear, hallucinations Drug-to-drug interactions Barbiturate general anesthetics, phenothiazines, and  MAOIs
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Narcotic Agonists–Antagonists
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course RNSG 1301 taught by Professor Loftin during the Spring '11 term at Lone Star College.

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Chapter 26.pe - Chapter26 NarcoticsandAntimigraineAgents

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