Chapter 28.pe - Agents Chapter28 Copyright 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams Wilkins Copyright 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health |

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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Neuromuscular Junction Blocking  Agents Chapter 28
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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Site of Action of Neuromuscular Junction
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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Categories of Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ)  Blockers Nondepolarizing  Act as antagonists to acetylcholine (ACh) at the NMJ and  prevent depolarization of muscle cells Depolarizing  Act as an ACh agonist, causing stimulation of the muscle cell  and preventing it from repolarizing
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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Action of Neuromuscular Junction (NMJ) Blockers Both are used to cause paralysis (loss of muscular function) For performance of surgical procedures  To facilitate mechanical ventilation
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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Sliding Filament Theory of Muscle Contraction
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Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Action of Nondepolarizing NMJ Blockers Similar in structure to ACh Occupy the muscular cholinergic receptor site, preventing ACh  from reacting with the receptor Does not cause activation of muscle cells; muscle contraction  does not occur Not broken down by acetylcholinesterase; effect is more long- lasting than that of ACh Used when clinical situations require muscle paralysis
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course RNSG 1301 taught by Professor Loftin during the Spring '11 term at Lone Star College.

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Chapter 28.pe - Agents Chapter28 Copyright 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams Wilkins Copyright 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health |

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