PETER SINGER Famine

PETER SINGER Famine - PETER SINGER Famine Affluence and...

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PETER SINGER Famine, Affluence, and Morality As I write this, in November Ig7I, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical care. The suffering and death that are occurring there now are not inevitable, not unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refu- gees; nevertheless, it is not beyond the capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to very small proportions. The decisions and actions of human beings can prevent this kind of suffering. Unfortunately, human beings have not made the necessary decisions. At the individual level, people have, with very few exceptions, not responded to the situation in any significant way. Generally speaking, people have not given large sums to relief funds; they have not written to their parliamentary representatives demand- ing increased government assistance; they have not demonstrated in the streets, held symbolic fasts, or done anything else directed toward providing the refugees with the means to satisfy their essential needs. At the government level, no government has given the sort of massive aid that would enable the refugees to survive for more than a few days. Britain, for instance, has given rather more than most countries. It has, to date, given ?I4,750,ooo. For comparative purposes, Britain's share of the nonrecoverable development costs of the Anglo-French Concorde project is already in excess of ? 275,ooo,ooo, and on present estimates will reach ?440,000,000. The implication is that the British government values a supersonic transport more than thirty times as 230 Philosophy & Public Affairs highly as it values the lives of the nine million refugees. Australia is another country which, on a per capita basis, is well up in the "aid to Bengal" table. Australia's aid, however, amounts to less than one- twelfth of the cost of Sydney's new opera house. The total amount given, from all sources, now stands at about ?65,ooo,ooo. The esti- mated cost of keeping the refugees alive for one year is ?464,000,000. Most of the refugees have now been in the camps for more than six months. The World Bank has said that India needs a minimum of ?300,000,000 in assistance from other countries before the end of the year. It seems obvious that assistance on this scale will not be forth- coming. India will be forced to choose between letting the refugees starve or diverting funds from her own development program, which will mean that more of her own people will starve in the future.' These are the essential facts about the present situation in Bengal. So far as it concerns usi here,
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This note was uploaded on 02/19/2011 for the course PHIL 110 taught by Professor Kay during the Fall '07 term at S.F. State.

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PETER SINGER Famine - PETER SINGER Famine Affluence and...

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