23. Chap 10. 5,6 ecampus - total pressure of a gas mixture...

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Stoichiometry It’s back again…. • Given 2H 2 O 2 ( g ) O 2 ( g ) + 2H 2 O ( g ) , what mass of H 2 O 2 should be used to produce 3.00 L of O 2 gas measured at 25.0 ˚C and 1.00 atm? • Given 2KClO 3 ( s ) 2KCl ( s ) + 3O 2 ( g ) , calculate the volume of oxygen gas produced at 35.0 ˚C and 8.0 atm from the decomposition of 20.8 g of potassium chlorate.
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The partial pressure of a gas Is the pressure of each gas in a mixture. Is the pressure that gas would exert if it were by itself in the container. Partial Pressure
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So far we have seen P tot = P 1 + P 2 + P 3 + … and we know • P 1 = n 1 RT 1 /V 1 P 2 = n 2 RT 2 /V 2 P 3 = n 3 RT 3 /V 3 If we substitute the pressures, we will have Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure
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P tot = (n 1 + n 2 + n 3 + …)RT/V or • P tot = n total RT/V Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure
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Suppose you have 20.0 g of Ar, 30.0 g of HF, and 5.00 g of He in a 3.06-L vessel at 25 ˚ C. What is the partial pressure of each gas and the total pressure of the mixture? Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure
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Suppose that the
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Unformatted text preview: total pressure of a gas mixture that contains 95.0 g of Ne and 105 g of Ar is 56.9 atm. What is the partial pressure of Ar in the mixture? Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure • Gases consist of large numbers of molecules that are in continuous, random motion. Kinetic-Molecular Theory • The combined volume of all the molecules of the gas is negligible relative to the total volume in which the gas is contained. • Attractive and repulsive forces between gas molecules are negligible. Kinetic-Molecular Theory • Energy can be transferred between molecules during collisions, but the average kinetic energy of the molecules does not change with time, as long as the temperature of the gas remains constant. In other words collisions are elastic Kinetic-Molecular Theory • The average kinetic energy of the molecules is proportional to the absolute temperature Kinetic-Molecular Theory...
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2011 for the course CHEM 1411 taught by Professor Thopson during the Spring '11 term at École Normale Supérieure.

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23. Chap 10. 5,6 ecampus - total pressure of a gas mixture...

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