Experiment 2 lab write up - I: Hexane is a nonpolar...

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I: Hexane is a nonpolar substance that has London forces as intermolecular forces. It is miscible with polar aprotic, with forces such as dipole-induced dipole and induced dipole-induced dipole. However, it was not miscible with water because it is polar and therefore the dipole-dipole interactions of water are stronger than the dipole-induced dipole interactions the two. II: Water’s intermolecular forces are dipole-dipole interactions. Solvents displayed intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole, dipole-induced dipole and induced dipole-induced dipole. Two layers resulted because of the polarity of water and the non-polarity of the solutes. Ethanol (polar protic) elicited a reaction, due to the mutual polarity of the solute and solvent. III: The solutes appeared to have varying degrees of solubility in water. This is due to the polarity of both molecules. As the size of these linear molecules increased, they became gradually less and less soluble because of increased London Dispersion Forces. IV: Benzoic acid has dipole-dipole, and dipole-induced dipole interactions. Post boiling, benzoic
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2011 for the course CHEM 3A taught by Professor Fretchet during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Experiment 2 lab write up - I: Hexane is a nonpolar...

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