Test 3- 11-1

Test 3- 11-1 - TheCaribbean TheCaribbean...

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The Caribbean The Caribbean Musical Energy of Island Peoples
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Jamaica Jamaica English/British colony from 1670-1962 Majority of population of African  descent Also large populations of Indians and  Chinese Official language is English, most  people speak Jamaican Patois  (Patwa)
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Jamaican Popular Music Jamaican Popular Music 1950s: mobile, outdoor  sound  systems  playing latest hits (especially  Ska (1960-1966) – Jamaica’s first  commercial popular music Characteristic  offbeat  rhythm  (guitar/piano) Primarily features horn (saxophones,  trumpets, trombones); instrumental solos Recording studios: Duke Reid’s  Treasure Isle, Coxsone Dodd’s Studio 
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Jamaican Popular Music Jamaican Popular Music Rock steady (1966-68) Maintains offbeat, but slower tempo Focus on singers instead of horns Prominent, melodic bass lines Riddim – instrumental track (bass 
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This note was uploaded on 02/20/2011 for the course MUS 107 taught by Professor Reynolds during the Spring '11 term at CUNY Hunter.

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Test 3- 11-1 - TheCaribbean TheCaribbean...

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