Psych-5-10 lecture

Psych-5-10 lecture - CHAPTER 13- 2nd ed. 14 3rd How Do We...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/21/11 CHAPTER How Do We Learn and Remember? Connecting Learning and Memory Dissociating Memory Circuits Neural Systems Underlying Explicit and Implicit Memories Plasticity and Recovery From Injury 13- 2nd ed. 14 – 3rd ed.
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2/21/11 Connecting Learning and Learning: A change in an organism’s behavior as a result of experience Memory: The ability to recall or recognize previous experience Memory Trace : A mental representation of a previous experience
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2/21/11 Eye-Blink Conditioning Commonly used experimental technique in which subjects learn to pair a formerly neutral stimulus to a defensive eye- blinking response
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2/21/11 Pavlovian Conditioning A neutral stimulus (such as a tone) comes to elicit a response because of its repeated pairing with some event (such as the delivery of food); also called classical conditioning or respondent conditioning Conditioned Stimulus (CS): In Pavlovian conditioning, an originally neutral stimulus that, after association with an unconditioned
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2/21/11 Unconditioned Response (UCR) In classical conditioning, the unlearned, naturally occurring response to the unconditioned stimulus, such as salivation when food is in the mouth Conditioned Response (CR) In Pavlovian conditioning, the learned response to a formerly neutral conditioned stimulus (CS) Fear Conditioning Learned association, a conditioned emotional response, between a neutral Pavlovian Conditioning
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Kolb & Whishaw, An Introduction to Brain and Behavior , Learning procedure in which the consequences (such as obtaining a reward) of a particular behavior (such as pressing a bar) increase or decrease the probability of the behavior occurring
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2/21/11 Visuospatial learning Using visual information to identify an object’s location in space Example: Morris Task - When placed into a swimming pool of opaque water, rats quickly learn the location of a hidden platform Learning Set: An understanding of how a problem can be solved
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2/21/11 Two Categories of Memory Implicit Memory Memory in which subjects can demonstrate knowledge but cannot explicitly retrieve the information; unconscious learning Example : Implicit association test . Implicit memories are often retained even with amnesia. Explicit Memory Memory in which a subject can retrieve an item and indicate that he or she knows that the retrieved item is the correct item; conscious memory Example: Declarative Memory - Ability to
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An Introduction to Brain and Behavior , Ability to recall a movement sequence or how to perform some act or behavior Procedural Memory Priming
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Psych-5-10 lecture - CHAPTER 13- 2nd ed. 14 3rd How Do We...

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