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Notes covered in Exam3 - What happens near a Black Hole?...

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Unformatted text preview: What happens near a Black Hole? General Properties of Black Holes Albert Einstein and General Relativity Gravitational Radiation Frame Dragging Orbiting a Black Hole Falling into a Black Hole Hawking Radiation from a Black Hole Masses of Black Holes Primordial - can be any size, including very small (If > 10 14 g, they would still exist; if < 10 14 g, vanished ) Stellar Mass black holes, at least 3 M o , many examples Intermediate mass black holes, 100s to 1000s M o Massive black holes, ~ 10 6 M o , e.g. center of Milky Way Supermassive Black Holes, ~ 10 8- 10 10 M , seen in centers of active galactic nuclei of galaxies and as quasars. Black Hole Structure Schwarzschild radius defnes the event horizon R Sch = 2GM/c 2 Nothing can escape, once it has crossed the event horizon Cosmic censorship: you cannot see inside the event horizon The First Black Hole Discovered Cygnus X-1 binary system (stellar mass BH) Most likely mass is 16(+/-5) M Mass determined by Doppler shift measurements of spectral lines Binary Star Systems Often stars are formed in binary systems When components have unequal masses, the more massive star will evolve faster and may become a supernova. In some cases, the supernova of the primary star will not disrupt the binary system and a compact binary is formed. Mass transfer can then occur from the main sequence star onto the collapsed, compact companion star, which can be a neutron star or a black hole. Milky Ways Central Black Hole Best evidence comes from...
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2011 for the course ASTR 2340 taught by Professor Rupalichandar during the Spring '10 term at Toledo.

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Notes covered in Exam3 - What happens near a Black Hole?...

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