naval leadership - Responsibility Accountability and One...

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Responsibility, Accountability, and One Marine NS402
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Responsibility, Accountability, and One Marine 1 “One of the most important factors in leadership is seeking responsibility and accountability.”(Montor, 100) said Admiral Carney. A naval officer should take full responsibility for his unit and everything that happens to it. The Captain customarily takes credit for everything that is excellent, but also takes the blame for everything that is below standard. An individual’s sense of responsibility ought to apply in his personal life as well. The people in command, whether of a ship or a corporation, value individuals who seek out responsibility and who are accountable for their actions. Accountability is a key concept for officers. Accountability, in the Random House College dictionary, is defined as,”(1) being subject to the obligation to report, explain, or justify something;(2) being answerable; and (3) being capable of explaining.”(Montor, 100) Admiral Nakamura stated, “…an officer should take full responsibility for all of his actions, even when he is following orders or instructions from his senior. If he tries to escape that responsibility, he will give up the confidence of both his seniors and his subordinates.”(Montor, 100) Vermont C. Royster once wrote, “On the sea there is a tradition older even then the traditions of the country itself…. It is the tradition that with responsibility goes authority and with them both goes accountability…”(Montor, 101) It’s important to keep your senior officer informed concerning all actions, especially when someone outside the organization might ask questions of him. Officers are normally known for their ability to do many things at once, and to do them correctly. In these situations it’s no problem for the officer to alert his senior of what he has
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accomplished. Nonetheless, there are times when a mistake could be made. It is the responsibility of the officer to Responsibility, Accountability, and One Marine 2 report to the senior about the events, and the circumstances. People are always afraid of making mistakes, but today it seems that people are concerned that one mistake will lead to the end of their career. Admiral Burke stated, “…if an officer makes a mistake, he should let the boss know first, so that the boss hears about it from the officer responsible rather than from someone else.”(Montor, 101) Another importance is for officers to take responsibility for the actions of their subordinates. Trouble can’t always be avoided and
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2011 for the course HUMANITIES 101 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '01 term at United States Merchant Marine Academy.

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naval leadership - Responsibility Accountability and One...

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