Writing a Critique

Writing a Critique - Writing a Critique Writing a Critique...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Writing a Critique Writing a Critique When you write a critique, your goal is to make a formal analysis of and response to a piece of writing, whether a selected passage, an entire essay or an entire novel. Your purpose encompasses both explaining and evaluating. In general, a critique includes these components (1) an introduction; (2) an objective, concise summary of the work or passage ;(3) an objective analysis of the authors presentation of the material; (4) a subjective response detailing your opinion of how the author handled his subject, whether or not he achieved his purpose and how his style and structure connected with his purposes; (5) a conclusion. A critique differs from a summary, which is an objective restatement in your own words of the original material. When you summarize, you leave out your personal or subjective viewpoint. In a critique, you begin objectively but then add your own subjective response. A Note on Verb Tense Whenever you write about or refer to another person’s work, use the present tense “Truman Capote suggests…” or” Capote argues that…” Use the past tense only to refer to something that happened before the time span of the work. “Capote’s work is then result of what first began as a magazine article.” Introduction
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 2

Writing a Critique - Writing a Critique Writing a Critique...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online