Plagiarism+exercise - ENG 125.078, Fall 2008 Instructor:...

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ENG 125.078, Fall 2008 Instructor: Lauren Squires R ECOGNIZING P LAGIARISM Original passage: Except for a few onomatopoetic words ( bang, hiss, grunt ), the assignment of meanings to certain combinations of sounds is arbitrary. We English speakers might just as well call a chair a glotz or a blurg , as long as we all agreed that these combinations of sounds meant chair . In fact, not just the words but the individual sounds used in English have been arbitrarily selected from a much larger inventory of sounds which the human vocal organs are capable of producing. The existence of African languages employing musical tones or clicks reminds us that the forty phonemes used in English represent an arbitrary selection from hundreds of available sounds. Grammar, too, is arbitrary. We have a rule in English which requires most adjectives to appear before the noun which they modify ( the blue chair ). In French, the syntax is reversed ( la chaise bleue ), and in some languages, like Latin, either order is allowed. From page 45 of:
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This note was uploaded on 02/21/2011 for the course ENGLISH 125 taught by Professor Decourcy during the Summer '09 term at University of Michigan.

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Plagiarism+exercise - ENG 125.078, Fall 2008 Instructor:...

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