ch5 - FM 3-3 CB Chapter 5 Reconnaissance Monitoring and...

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Unformatted text preview: FM 3-3 CB Chapter 5 Reconnaissance, Monitoring, and Survey: Planning, Conducting, Recording, and Reporting Chemical and Biological (CB) reconnaissance, monitoring, and survey may be divided into two main categories; chemical and biological operations. Location of Chemical Agents Chemical downwind hazard prediction in Chapter 3 provide a means of locating probable chemical hazards. Before units can avoid chemical agents, they must know what type of agent is present and where it is located. Nonpersistent agents are present as a vapor hazard (except in and around the shell crater). Persistent agents are present as both a liquid and vapor hazard. Liquid agents are usually found in the attack area. Vapor hazards are in both the attack and hazard area. Vapor hazards are the most difficult to predict. They may arise from an agent delivered as a vapor or from evaporation of a liquid chemical agent. The chemical downwind hazard prediction, described in Chapter 3, outlines the largest area vapor could travel. Within that prediction, there are both clean areas and areas where chemical agent vapor still linger. Although computer modeling of the terrain and weather conditions would provide a better picture of where chemical agents may go, it does not preclude sending a soldier to that specific location to verify whether or not the agent in question is there. To accomplish this, units may use the Automatic Chemical Agent Alarm (M8A1), the Chemical Agent Monitor (CAM), and the M256 Samplers/Detectors to locate vapor hazards. FM 3-4 describes in greater detail how weather and terrain affect where chemical agent vapor will exist. The location of liquid chemical agents is much easier to predict because wind and terrain do not affect their location. It takes significant weather such as a heavy rainfall to move liquid chemical agents. They decompose through weathering; liquid agents usually will evaporate from exposed areas and collect in sheltered areas. Units use ABC MS or M9 Detector Paper to detect liquid hazards. Recon, monitoring, and survey methods are used to locate liquid and vapor hazards. Reconnaissance Recon is searching for chemical hazards in an area before a unit moves into or through the area. All units use reconnaissance to locate chemical hazards. CB recon techniques are similar to conventional recon techniques. Before moving into or occupying an area, units check the area for enemy activity and the presence of chemical hazards. When in a static position, units recon areas around their positions. The recon team or element may have an Automatic Chemical Agent Alarm , CAM , M256 Series Detector Kit, ABC M8 Paper, M9 Paper, M272 Water Test Kit, and M34 Sampling kit. Division recon elements may also be equipped with the M-93 NBC Reconnaissance Vehicle (FOX)....
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ch5 - FM 3-3 CB Chapter 5 Reconnaissance Monitoring and...

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