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Chapter 6 M - CHAPTER 6 GASES CHM 25/Spring 2009 Prof R.S...

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CHAPTER 6 – GASES CHM 25/Spring 2009 Prof. R.S. Miller
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Composition of Earth’s Atmosphere Compound %(Volume) Mole Fraction a Nitrogen 78.08 0.7808 Oxygen 20.95 0.2095 Argon 0.934 0.00934 C b di id 0 033 0 00033 Carbon dioxide 0.033 0.00033 Methane 2 x 10 -4 2 x 10 -6 Hydrogen 5 x 10 -5 5 x 10 -7 5 7 a. mole fraction = mol component/total mol in mixture.
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Properties of Gases Gases are highly compressible and occupy the full volume of their containers. When a gas is subjected to pressure, its volume decreases. Gases always form homogeneous mixtures with h other gases. Gases only occupy about 0.1 % of the volume of their containers their containers.
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Measurement of Pressure
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Elevation and Atmospheric Pressure
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Units for Expressing Pressure Unit Value Atmosphere 1 atm Pascal (Pa) 1 atm = 1.01325 x 10 5 Pa Kilopascal (kPa) 1 atm = 101.325 kPa mmHg 1 atm = 760 mmHg Torr 1 atm = 760 torr Bar 1 atm = 1 01325 bar 1 atm 1.01325 bar mbar 1 atm = 1013.25 mbar psi 1 atm = 14 7 psi 1 atm = 14.7 psi
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Manometer
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Boyle’s Law (1627-1691) Boyle’s Law: the volume of a fixed quantity of gas is inversely Boyle s Law: the volume of a fixed quantity of gas is inversely proportional to its pressure. Boyle (1627-1691) used a manometer to carry out the experiment.
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