Lab 4 Report

Lab 4 Report - 1 Objective(s): In this lab, the students...

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1 Objective(s): In this lab, the student’s objective is: To gain some experience using MSI (Medium – Scale – Integrated) circuits [1]. Build a controller for a simple vending machine [1]. Understand the design process and the role of simulation in a circuit design [1]. Expected Outcome(s): The expected outcome is: Describe the function of; and use: o A 7485, 4-bit magnitude comparator [1]. o A 74283, 4-bit binary full adder [1]. o A 74175, quad D flip-flop [1]. Interpret and use the function definition table of an MSI circuit [1]. Simulate a controller for a simple vending machine [1]. Build and debug a controller for a simple vending machine [1].
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2 Results: Task 4.1 Create Your Design Specification Task Statement: The task was to create a design specification for the vending machine. Vending Machine Inputs: Coins o Quarter o Dime o Nickel Product Select Coin Return Internal Input: Cost of product being vended. Vend product (for reset) Clock. Outputs: Vend product The vending machine will consist of 3 main types of ICs; an adder, 74283, a state register, 74175, and a comparator, 7485. The adder will take the input of the coins. Essentially, the output of the adder will be the B input of the adder while the new input of coins is the A input. Before the output of the adder becomes input B of the adder, it first goes through a state register. The state register controls the clock and the reset. This allows the controller to reset the machine via coin return or product select (when there is enough coins in the
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0 1 Quarter B2 B3 B4 B1 A4 A3 A2 A1 ·4 ·3 ·2 ·1 C0 C4 283 7 5 3 14 12 6 2 15 11 4 1 13 10 9 0 1 Nickel 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F 0 1 Dime 0 1 Quarter B2 B3 B4 B1 A4 A3 A2 A1 ·4 ·3 ·2 ·1 C0 C4 283 5 3 14 12 6 2 15 11 4 1 13 10 0 1 Nickel 2 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F 0 1 Dime 0 1 Quarter B2 B3 B4 B1 A4 A3 A2 A1 ·4 ·3 ·2 ·1 C0 C4 283 5 3 14 12 6 2 15 11 4 1 13 10 0 1 Nickel 1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F 0 1 Dime 0 1 Quarter B2 B3 B4 B1 A4 A3 A2 A1 ·4 ·3 ·2 ·1 C0 C4 283 5 3 14 12 6 2 15 11 4 1 13 10 0 1 Nickel 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 A B C D E F 0 1 Dime 3 machine). The clock controls the coin input so the coins don’t just get sucked into the
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This note was uploaded on 02/22/2011 for the course EEE 120 taught by Professor Tylavsky during the Fall '10 term at ASU.

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Lab 4 Report - 1 Objective(s): In this lab, the students...

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