Lecture 7 and 8-sensory transduction

Lecture 7 and 8-sensory transduction - SENSORY TRANSDUCTION...

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SENSORY TRANSDUCTION Vision (photons) Hearing (mechanical via air compression) Taste (chemical) Smell (chemical) Touch-pressure (mechanical) Proprioception (mechanical) Pain-temperature (mechanical, thermal) All stimuli are converted to receptor potentials (generator potentials (GP) that produce AP’s. Information(AP) received by the CNS is encoded by many features of the AP’s: Frequency of firing, temporal patterns, periodicity, consistency Types of AP discharges AP Time (msec) 1
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Basic Organization of Sensory Transduction input GP AP AP AP Neural Network AP AP EPP Contraction Spinal cord Or Cranial nerves or cranial nerve ganglion Fig. 4-8 2
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Ascending Sensory Input to Cortex Descending Motor Output to Muscle Principles of Neural Science: p342 p346 3 Horizontal and segmental organization of spinal cord Vertical coordination and control of segments
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Dermatomes Represented on Homo Sapiens in Quadrupedal Position Patterns of DRG innervation of skin reflects segmental organization of spinal cord Overlapping innervations of a dermatome requires Anesthesia of several Adjacent dorsal roots Fig. 7-4 4
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Dermatome and Shingles Shingles is caused by reactivation of herpes zoster viruses that lay dormant in DRG neurons. The virus causes chickenpox in childhood and can stay dormant in DRG neurons for several decades 5
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Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) Neuron A DRG neuron has a single axon that bifurcates to the sensory organ and the spinal cord. This single axon transmits AP from the sensory organ to the next neuron in the spinal cord. AP is generated by stretch of muscle spindle in case below. Mechanosensitive channels elicit AP, which travels to the spinal cord to release Glu. Glu elicits EPSP on the motor neuron, which makes the muscle contract (through releasing Ach). 6
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Lecture 7 and 8-sensory transduction - SENSORY TRANSDUCTION...

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