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SocialPsychologyModule30 - Social Psychology Professor Ann...

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Social Psychology Professor Ann Ruecker
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Helping Behavior The case of Kitty Genovese (1964) Theories of Altruism Social Exchange Theory Reciprocity norm Social-responsibility norm When do people help one another? Bystander effect Diffusion of responsibility
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The Case of Kitty Genovese (1964) The Facts: March 13, 1964 at 3:15 a.m. after coming home from work Multiple stab wounds Died on the way to the hospital at approximately 4:15 a.m. 38 people witnessed the murder
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The Case of Kitty Genovese (1964) Kitty Genovese Location of murder
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The Case of Kitty Genovese (1964) Why do people help? Why are they “altruistic”?
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Theories of Altruism: Social Exchange Theory Social exchange theory says it’s because we need to know if the rewards for helping will outweigh the costs Is this truly selfless?
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Theories of Altruism: Reciprocity Norm Reciprocity norm says that we need to pay back; that is, we help those who help us. For example, I get you a job, you return the favor Pro-bono work is often based on the reciprocity norm
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