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- Social Psychology Professor Ann Ruecker Attractiveness and Love Proximity Implicit egotism Physical attractiveness Like attracts like Need to

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Social Psychology Professor Ann Ruecker
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Attractiveness and Love Proximity Implicit egotism Physical attractiveness Like attracts like Need to belong Love Passionate love Companionate love Maintaining your relationship The Internet…discussion Breaking up is hard to do: or is it?
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Proximity In general, we become involved with those who we are in close proximity….”the girl or boy next door” Interaction – “functional distance”: how many times you cross paths (e.g., how many classes do you have together, do you live in the same house, go to the same parties, go to the same church or synagogue…and so on) Anticipatory liking (i.e., anticipation of interaction) – when you anticipate that you will have an interaction with a person you will enter the relationship liking the person versus not liking Example: You are about to go on a blind date with someone and you decide to “give it your best” and will enter the date more optimistic than negative.
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Proximity Mere exposure – Familiarity breeds liking, not contempt (research has shown) Once you meet someone and you keep seeing them a lot you may find them more attractive over time Politicians use this in campaigns. ..over and over again Advertisers and marketing agencies…over and over again If it occurs to often, i.e., incessant, like a particular song, then yes it will get old What about stereotypes and prejudice?
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Proximity Prejudice and Stereotypes uncomfortable of the unfamiliar. If you have not been exposed to certain groups of people you may hold particular stereotypes about those groups
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Implicit Egotism Beyond the self-serving bias….we like things better that we can associate with ourselves…. Okay, so think about your birthdays…do you prefer those numbers more than others? Think about your name? …the letters Think about your own face…are you more attracted to people with faces like you?“
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Implicit Egotism From your book (Meyers, 2009, p. 301), Philadelphia, being larger than Jacksonville, has 2.2  times as many men named Jack.  But it has 10.4  times as many people named Philip.  Likewise,  Virginia Beach has a disproportionate number of  people named Virginia…Yet America’s dentists are  almost twice as likely to be named Dennis as Jerry  or Walter.  There also are 2.5 times as many dentists  named Denise…People named George or Geoffrey  are overrepresented among geoscientists (geologists,  geophysicists, and geochemists).
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Physical Attractiveness Looks do matter (like it or not) Some research has shown men put more value on appearance than women and women are more about personality, thus, More women (90%) are the recipients of cosmetic surgery….however, Some research has shown that both men and
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course PSYC 2700 taught by Professor Ruecker during the Spring '11 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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- Social Psychology Professor Ann Ruecker Attractiveness and Love Proximity Implicit egotism Physical attractiveness Like attracts like Need to

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