23 - DNA Repair 23.1...

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DNA Repair 23.1 Figure 30-51 Types and sites of chemical damage to which DNA is normally susceptible in vivo. Red, oxidation; blue, hydrolysis; green, methylation. http://www.nih.gov/sigs/dna-rep/whatis.html
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Proteins involved in the DNA repair in E. coli . http://www.web-books.com/MoBio/Free/Ch7G.htm 23.2
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E. coli base excision repair DNA bases may be modified by deamination or alkylation. DNA glycosylases can recognize damaged bases and remove them. The gap is filled by DNA polymerase I and DNA ligase. http://www.web-books.com/MoBio/Free/Ch7G.htm Lehninger 23.3
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Base excision repair (BER) is a process that corrects nonbulky damage to bases. BER has two subpathways, both of which are initiated by a DNA glycosylase. Glycosylase action creates an apyrimidinic/apurinic (AP) or abasic site, which is processed by an AP endonuclease. In the “short-patch” subpathway, a single nucleotide is added, followed by ligation. In the long-patch subpathway, DNA synthesis of multiple nucleotides occurs and the displaced oligonucleotide overhang is removed by the FEN-1 endonuclease. 23.4
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23 - DNA Repair 23.1...

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