1 - (left), Q on the N side is reduced to the semiquinone...

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1.1 Figure 16-2 ATP and NADPH are the sources of free energy for biosynthetic reactions.
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1.2 Figure 16-1 Map of the major metabolic pathways in a typical cell.
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1.3
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1.4 Figure 16-3 Overview of catabolism.
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1.5 Figure 17-3 Degradation of glucose via the glycolytic pathway. Glycolysis
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1.6 Figure 21-1 Reactions of the citric acid cycle.
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1.7 Figure 22-14 The mitochondrial electron-transport chain. Figure 22-29 Coupling of electron transport ( green arrow ) and ATP synthesis. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation NADH is equivalent to 3 ATP FADH 2 is equivalent to 2 ATP
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1.8 FIGURE 19-12 The Q cycle, shown in two stages. The path of electrons through Complex III is shown by blue arrows. In the first stage
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Unformatted text preview: (left), Q on the N side is reduced to the semiquinone radical, which in the second stage (right) is converted to QH2. Meanwhile, on the P side of the membrane, two molecules of QH2 are oxidized to Q, releasing two protons per Q molecule (four protons in all) into the intermembrane space. Each QH2 donates one electron (via the Rieske Fe-S center) to cytochrome c 1, and one electron (via cytochrome b ) to a molecule of Q near the N side, reducing it in two steps to QH2. This reduction also uses two protons per Q, which are taken up from the matrix. 1.9 Figure 27-1 The major energy metabolism pathways. 1.10 (calories) electronegative 1.11...
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course CHEM 4731 taught by Professor Mchenry during the Spring '08 term at Colorado.

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1 - (left), Q on the N side is reduced to the semiquinone...

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