week 8 DQ1 - pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Justice is a central component in post-colonial philosophy; it is a philosophy that is trying to break the shackles from a long history of subjugation and oppression. Post-colonial writers, thinkers, and leaders were concerned with rediscovering and redefining this concept, as it is something that was lost to them a long time. Having an education in philosophy was important for post-colonial thinkers because they needed a way to think outside of colonialism. Colonialism was based on forcing the colonized people to adopt the culture and social systems of the colonizers. Philosophy was useful for these thinkers because it offered them a perspective from which to analyze those systems that were forced upon them. By analyzing these systems using a philosophical framework, post-colonial thinkers were able to see their flaws and therefore oppose them. Financial considerations and the international market have had profound effects on the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial world's experiences with justice and injustice. These financial considerations actually lead to forms of injustice during the pre-colonial and colonial periods. In pre-colonial societies, slave trading was commonplace and prevented pre-colonial peoples, particularly those from Africa from receiving justice. People become commodities, and were considered monetarily valuable. Colonization was, in many respects, based on the prospects of making money by exploiting entire groups of people. Financial considerations and the international market may have a positive effect on the post-colonial world. As post-colonial peoples are not enslaved physically or ideologically anymore, they have the freedom and right to sell their labor and goods....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Svatos during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 2

week 8 DQ1 - pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online