SOLID_STATE_ELECTRONIC_DEVICES_1 - SOLID STATE ELECTRONIC...

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SOLID STATE ELECTRONIC DEVICES P 24L Lecturer: Dr. Leary Myers
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Assessment: Course Test 20% Laboratory 20% Final Examination 60% Laboratory Days and Times: Mondays & Wednesdays 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
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SOLID STATE ELECTRONIC DEVICES P24L 1. Introduction 2. Semiconductor Materials and Properties 3. Field Effect Transistors (FETs) (i) Structure and physical properties. I-V characteristics. (ii) MOSFETs and JFETs. (iii) Analysis of FET amplifier circuits 4. The Bipolar Junction Transistor(BJT) (i) Physical structure and modes of operation. (ii) Analysis of BJT amplifier circuits. 5. Regulating devices Structure and characteristics of: (i) Zener diodes, (ii) Schottky diodes (iii) Gunn diodes (iv) Impatt diodes (v) SCRs (vi) Semiconductor Lasers
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SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS AND PROPERTIES Most electronic devices are fabricated by using semiconductor materials along with conductors and insulators. Silicon is by far the most common semiconductor material used for semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Other semiconductor materials are used for specialized applications. For example, gallium arsenide and related compounds are used for very-high speed devices and optical devices. 1.1.1 Intrinsic Semiconductors An atom is composed of a nucleus, which contains positively charged protons and neutral neutrons, and negatively charged electrons that, in a classical sense, orbit the nucleus. The electrons are distributed in various “shells” at different distances from the nucleus, and electron energy increases as shell radius increases. Electrons in the outermost shell are called valence electrons and the chemical activity of a material is determined primarily by the number of such electrons. Elements in the periodic table can be grouped according to the number of valence electrons. Si and Ge are in group IV and are elemental semiconductors . In contrast, gallium arsenide is a group III-V compound semiconductor . At T =0 K each electron is in its lowest possible energy state, so each covalent
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course ELETRONICS P24L taught by Professor Learymyers during the Spring '11 term at University of the West Indies at Mona.

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SOLID_STATE_ELECTRONIC_DEVICES_1 - SOLID STATE ELECTRONIC...

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