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C30J_2010_lecture_4 - C30J Chemical Analysis II Analytical...

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C30J Chemical Analysis II Analytical Atomic Spectrometry Lecture 4 March 19, 2010
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Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (continued)
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History of Atomic Absorption 19 Century: G. Kirchhoff and R. Bunsen explained phenomenon
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"Matter absorbs light at the same wavelength at which it emits light".
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1955: Walsh (Australia), Alkemade and Milatz (Holland) demonstrated Flame AA Alan Walsh and the First AAS Instrument (circa 1959)
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Practical AAS: Instrumental Components External Radiation Source Atomizer Wavelength Selector Detector / Readout Sample Introduction System 1 2 3 4 5
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Overall Flame AA Schematic
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Atomizers in AAS Combustion flame (FAAS) Heat of combustion of fuel and oxidant provides energy for atomization Slotted burner provides long path length for sensitivity (Absorbance also proportional to l)
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Flame Temperatures
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Disadvantages of flame atomization for AAS inefficient sample introduction low temperature reactive environment short residence time large sample consumption rate .
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Atomizers in AAS Electrothermal Atomizer (ETAAS), proposed in 1961 by Boris L’vov Electrically powered device, energy provided by ohmic heating Most common is a graphite tube – then called Graphite Furnace AAS
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