Chapter Ten - Chapter Ten: Resolve the Paradox Questions...

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C hapter Ten: Resolve the Paradox Questions Resolve the Paradox Questions Resolve the Paradox questions are generally easy to spot because of their distinctive stimuli: each stimulus presents a situation where two ideas or occurrences contradict each other. Because most people are very good at recognizing these paradox scenarios, they usually know after reading the stimulus that a Resolve the Paradox question is coming up. Stimulus Peculiarities Besides the discrepant or contradictory facts, most Resolve the Paradox stimuli contain the following features: 1. No conclusion One of the hallmarks of a Resolve the Paradox question is that the stimulus does not contain a conclusion. The author is not attempting to persuade you, he or she just presents two sets of contradictory facts. Thus, when you read a stimulus without a conclusion that contains a paradox, expect to see a Resolve question. If you read a fact set that does not contain a paradox, expect to see a Must Be True question or a Cannot Be True question (less likely). 2. Language of contradiction In order to present a paradox, the test makers use language that signals a contradiction is present, such as: But; However; Yet; Although; Paradoxically; Surprisingly. If you can recognize the paradox present in the stimulus, you will have a head start on prephrasing the answer and completing the problem more quickly. Second Family Information Model: Question Stem Features Resolve the Paradox question stem are easy to identify, and typically contain the following features: 1. An indication that the answer choices should be accepted as true Because Resolve the Paradox questions fall into the Second Question Family, you must accept the answer choices as true and then see if they resolve the paradox. Typically, the question stem will contain a phrase such as, “which one of the following, if true, . ..” 2. Key words that indicate your task is to resolve a problem To convey the nature of your task, Resolve the Paradox question stems usually use words from both of the lists below. The first list contains words used to describe the action you must take, the second list contains words used to describe the paradox present in the stimulus: Action Problem Resolve Paradox Explain Discrepancy Reconcile Contradiction Conflict Puzzle Here are several Resolve the Paradox question stem examples from actual LSATs: “Which one of the following, if true, would most effectively resolve the apparent paradox above?” “Which one of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent discrepancy in the passage above?” “Which one of the following, if true, most helps to explain the puzzling fact cited above?” “Which one of the following, if true, most helps to reconcile the discrepancy indicated above?” “Which one of the following, if true, most helps to resolve the apparent conflict described above?” You should attempt to prephrase an answer; many students are able to successfully predict a scenario that
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course CAREER DEV 101 taught by Professor Bruneil during the Spring '09 term at American Dubai.

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Chapter Ten - Chapter Ten: Resolve the Paradox Questions...

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