ArtHis - Comparison

ArtHis - Comparison - The Komo Kun is made of wood, resin,...

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Art History 55A: TA: Beth Rosenblum October 26, 2006 Comparison Assignment Masks are a large part of African culture. Masks can come in different forms from different parts of the world and yet they can still serve the same purpose or have similar attributes. Such is an example with a Komo Kun mask and a Do mask. The two masks in question are the Komo Kun mask of the Kono people and the Do mask of the Bwa people. Although the two masks are from different cultures, there are still similarities that can be found among them. Both masks are in a nonhuman form. They are grotesque and have a rough unfinished manner about them. Also, projections extend out of both masks. The Komo mask has grass projections while the Do mask has eagle feathers that project out. Another parallel is how in performance, the masquerader’s entire body is covered.
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Unformatted text preview: The Komo Kun is made of wood, resin, feathers, quills, fibers, and animal hair. On the other hand, the Do masks are made of vines, grass, and leaves. The Kono mask has horns that project out and is a horizontal mask while the Do mask is taller and more of a vertical mask. The Do society focuses on the renewal of life and the untamed bush while the Komo is a group shrouded in secrecy; women and nonmembers are banned from the performances. As the power of the Do mask also embodies human fertility, the Kono mask can be used to identify and destroy evil. From the shape to the cultural background of each mask is distinct in its own way. Even from a completely different culture, there can still be characteristics that tie together different masks....
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course ART HIS 50 taught by Professor Stinsapir during the Fall '00 term at UCLA.

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