Sex Education in schools (2)

Sex Education in schools (2) - Sex Education in Schools1...

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1 Sex Education in Schools Sex Education in Schools Tracy Swinford Axia College University of Phoenix
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2 Sex Education in Schools When people think about sex education, what comes to mind? The talk the girls received in the fifth grade, or health class in high school? Unfortunately that is not the kind of education our children need. Although parents are the ones that should be teaching their children about sex and prevention, the schools have been given the responsibility instead. But are they actually giving them an education on how to be safe or just how the body works? Or should the parents be the ones to give the proper education when it comes to sex? Sex education should be a joint effort between the schools and the parents. This is the only way adolescents are going to get the proper information and be able to live a healthy productive life. In the early twentieth century, sex education was not as important as it is today. Women were to remain virgins until their wedding night, and men were taken out either by their families or coworkers to initiate them into sex. As time went on, sex education became more important, this is because the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s) were on the rise. This alarmed doctors, but they thought that it was only affecting the big cities and men visiting prostitutes. But what they didn’t realize is that those men were coming home and giving the STD to their wives. With this in mind sex education was started. When it was first being taught, the educators tried to work through the parents, churches, and public lectures. Their reasoning behind this was that young people are stuck between puberty and marriage and they needed guidance. This is where public schools came into play. They figured they could teach the children where the parents were failing. They eventually came up with a program that would quash any curiosity. Initially it began with a doctor giving a short series of talks about the
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3 Sex Education in Schools reproductive system, the harmful effects of STD’s, and the moral and medical dangers of having sex before marriage or having sex outside of the marriage. Boys and girls sat in separate classrooms and the lessons were very different. Boys learned that they have a moral responsibility to their moms and future wives to stay celibate. The girls had warnings of contracting an STD from a male who had sex before marriage or outside of their marriage. Some of the girls concerned the doctors because they thought they would never get married because they were scared. (Moron, 2000). In the 1960s and 1970s during the “sexual revolution” the rate of premarital sex, STD’s and pregnancy climbed sharply. Moron (2000) “The SIECUS (Sexuality Information Education Council of the United States) believed that teaching children in a neutral manner would allow them to make their own decisions on sexual behavior and sexual morality. Sexuality education was supposed to include information on birth control, teen pregnancy, masturbation, gender
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Sex Education in schools (2) - Sex Education in Schools1...

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