1_20_2010 - What are the two main cellular types that make...

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Unformatted text preview: What are the two main cellular types that make up the NS? What is a neuron specialized for? What are the 4 functional zones of a neuron? › Input, integration, conduction, output › Electrical Activity › Glia and Neurons How Does Information Flow in the neuron? What is a Synapse? › Dendrite to axon terminal What is the neuron doctrine? metabolically › Tiny gaps where information is transferred › Independent structurally, functionally and Lamina Column Tract Nerve Nucleus Ganglion Ventral/Dorsal Contralateral/Ipsilateral Horizontal Plane Coronal Plane Sagittal Plane Posterior/Anterior Superior/Inferior Medial/Lateral Proximal/Distal Somatic › Consists of nerves Autonomic that send messages from the sense organs to the CNS and from the CNS to the muscles › Heart, intestines, other organs › 2 subdivisions: Sympathetic Parasympathetic Furrowed Gray Matter Gyri and Sulci 6 laminae Columnar organization Tectum (roof) Colliculi sensory info › Superior/Inferior Tegmentum › III and IV CNs Substantia Nigra › Dopamine neurons › Parkinsons Medulla › Breathing, heart rate, vomitting › Opiates suppress activity Pons (Bridge) Cerebellum › Axons cross over › Movement, timing, attention, balance 12 cranial nerves 1=frontal lobe, 3=cingulate cortex, 15=corpus callosum, 18=thalamus, 22=hypothalamus, 25=pons, 26=medulla,11&12=occipital lobe, 8,9,10,4,5=parietal lobe 3=olfactory tubercles, 9=optic chiasm, 12=hypothalamus (the hole is where the pituitary stalk attaches), 17=pons, 29=medulla, 6=temporal lobe 1=thalamus 3=pineal gland 4=superior colliculus 7=inferior colliculus 15=cerebellar peduncles ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2011 for the course PSYC 460 taught by Professor Lawrence during the Spring '10 term at South Carolina.

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1_20_2010 - What are the two main cellular types that make...

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