PSYC227_fall09_2sample_t

PSYC227_fall09_2sample_t - Learning Objec-ves Describe...

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Unformatted text preview: Learning Objec-ves Describe experimental situa-ons for which independent‐ measures t sta-s-c is appropriate Use the independent‐measures t‐sta-s-c to test hypothesis about the mean diFerence between two popula-ons Know assump-ons required for the independent‐measures t‐ sta-s-c to be interpretable Learn measures of eFect size for the independent‐measures t (r 2 and Cohen’s d) t‐test for 2 Independent Samples When the population variance is unknown When the population variance is known Computation: df = n-1 Between‐subjects research design Independent‐measures or between‐subjects design Separate sample for each treatment condi-on ex. men vs. women; students taught by method A vs. method B Repeated measures or within‐subjects design Samples obtained from the same set of data ex. Between‐subjects research design Independent‐measures or between‐subjects design Separate sample for each treatment condi-on ex. men vs. women; students taught by method A vs. method B Repeated measures or within‐subjects design Samples obtained from the same set of data ex. Depression scores before and aMer therapy. Two Independent Samples How can we compare responses from two separate groups on a given measure? Suppose subjects are randomly assigned to the two groups (e.g., Experimental vs. Control group). Each group may be a random sample from a speciFc popula-on (e.g., female / male). Sta-ng the hypotheses Study of eFects of aging and gender on short term memory in adults. 125 adults were asked to place 20 common objects (e.g. eyeglasses, keys) into the rooms of a computer‐image house. AMer performing some unrelated ac-vi-es, each subject was asked to recall the loca-ons of the objects they had placed. The number of correct responses (out of 20) was recorded....
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This note was uploaded on 02/24/2011 for the course PSYC 227 taught by Professor Shinkareva during the Fall '09 term at South Carolina.

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PSYC227_fall09_2sample_t - Learning Objec-ves Describe...

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