JAN_24_Lecture-Public_pt_1 - Jan 24, 2011 - Voltaire and...

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Jan 24, 2011 - Voltaire and the Enlightenment CWL 242 – Prof. George Gasyna Voltaire and Modernity 1. Voltaire (François-Marie Arouet, 1694-1778) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltaire - liberal, humanist, anti-tyranny, fiercely intellectual, polymath - a classic gentleman of the Enlightenment, embodying both the key ideas and the contradictions of the age? -1694-1778 - Francois Marie Arouet was the youngest of five children, a son of a notary clerk in the treasury department and of a minor aristocrat from the provinces. - Received his education at “Louis-le-Grand,” an elite Jesuit college in Paris, where he learned classical languages. - quit school at 17, befriended a number of young Parisian nobles; gained renown in the salons for his humorous (satirical) verses and off the cuff witticisms. - in 1717 was imprisoned in the Bastille for mocking the French monarchy and the high aristocracy. - composed a number of short works in prison, and adopted the pen name “Voltaire.” - In 1726, Voltaire insulted a powerful young aristocrat, the Chevalier De Rohan, and was given two options: further imprisonment or exile. He chose exile, traveled to England where he would live from 1726 to 1729. - In England he studied the philosophy of John Locke, the works of Newton, and English constitutional and trade law. On his return to Paris he published Philosophical Letters on the English , a series of essays on English customs and institutions, particularly Britain’s constitutional monarchy (as opposed to French absolutist rule) and what he perceived as CWL 242 Prof. Gasyna Spring 2011 1
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Jan 24, 2011 - Voltaire and the Enlightenment religious tolerance (in reality a grudging toleration of Catholics). The tract was interpreted as a
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This note was uploaded on 02/23/2011 for the course ECON 103 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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JAN_24_Lecture-Public_pt_1 - Jan 24, 2011 - Voltaire and...

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