15 - Oscillatory Motion

15 - Oscillatory Motion - Oscillations and Mechanical Waves...

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PART 2 ± Drops of water fall from a leaf into a pond. The disturbance caused by the falling water causes the water surface to oscillate. These oscillations are associated with waves moving away from the point at which the water fell. In Part 2 of the text, we will explore the principles related to oscillations and waves. (Don Bonsey/Getty Images) 451 e begin this new part of the text by studying a special type of motion called periodic motion. This is a repeating motion of an object in which the object continues to return to a given position after a fixed time interval. Familiar ob- jects that exhibit periodic motion include a pendulum and a beach ball floating on the waves at a beach. The back and forth movements of such an object are called oscil- We will focus our attention on a special case of periodic motion called sim- ple harmonic motion. We shall find that all periodic motions can be modeled as combinations of simple harmonic motions. Thus, simple harmonic motion forms a ba- sic building block for more complicated periodic motion. Simple harmonic motion also forms the basis for our understanding of mechani- Sound waves, seismic waves, waves on stretched strings, and water waves are all produced by some source of oscillation. As a sound wave travels through the air, elements of the air oscillate back and forth; as a water wave travels across a pond, elements of the water oscillate up and down and backward and for- ward. In general, as waves travel through any medium, the elements of the medium move in repetitive cycles. Therefore, the motion of the elements of the medium bears a strong resemblance to the periodic motion of an oscillating pendulum or an object attached to a spring. To explain many other phenomena in nature, we must understand the concepts of oscillations and waves. For instance, although skyscrapers and bridges appear to be rigid, they actually oscillate, a fact that the architects and engineers who design and build them must take into account. To understand how radio and television work, we must understand the origin and nature of electromagnetic waves and how they prop- agate through space. Finally, much of what scientists have learned about atomic structure has come from information carried by waves. Therefore, we must first study oscillations and waves if we are to understand the concepts and theories of atomic W Oscillations and Mechanical Waves
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Chapter 15 Oscillatory Motion CHAPTER OUTLINE 15.1 Motion of an Object Attached to a Spring 15.2 Mathematical Representation of Simple Harmonic Motion 15.3 Energy of the Simple Harmonic Oscillator 15.4 Comparing Simple Harmonic Motion with Uniform Circular Motion 15.5 The Pendulum 15.6 Damped Oscillations 15.7 Forced Oscillations 452 ± In the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, the tides undergo oscillations with very large amplitudes, such that boats often end up sitting on dry ground for part of the day. In this chapter, we will investigate the physics of oscillatory motion. (www.comstock.com)
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P eriodic motion
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15 - Oscillatory Motion - Oscillations and Mechanical Waves...

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