Woodrow Wilson - Prior to the turn of the century, the...

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Prior to the turn of the century, the United States pursued an aggressive foreign policy of expansionism, extending its political and economic influence across the globe. By the late 1800s, the oversaturation of American agricultural and industrial products outweighed local consumer needs, greatly lowering the prices, and associated land and materials costs. On the verge of an economic depression with the loss of economic viability, as well as the depletion of natural resources, government leadership sought to expand trade and financial in strategic areas across the globe to establish stable trade routes for American products and replenish supplies of raw materials. Commercial ventures were attempted in Hawaii, the Phillipines, Samoa, Guam, and the West Indies (Reasons, 2005, para. 2-5). By the turn of the twentieth century, the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, and later, President Theodore Roosevelt’s 1905 corollary to the Monroe Doctrine, documented and defined the vision of American foreign policy as the interest of the United States to be the purveyor and protector of federalism, democracy and self-government, prohibiting any foreign powers from establishing dominance in the Western Hemisphere. Roosevelt, through his
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Woodrow Wilson - Prior to the turn of the century, the...

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