2-Genetics of Populations (BB)-1

2-Genetics of Populations (BB)-1 - Overview of the Lecture...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. Darwin’s Observations 2. Darwin’s Theory of Evolution by Natural Selection Overview of the Lecture Overview of the Lecture
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Although Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection has been slightly modified as our understanding of genetics developed, after 150 years it remains the most consistent explanation of observed evolutionary patterns. Overview of the Lecture Overview of the Lecture
Background image of page 2
On the Origin of Species by Natural Selection (1859) –  connected  Pattern and Process Hypothesis 1:  All species have descended from one or a  few original life forms.  Hypothesis 2:  Evolution occurs by the process of natural  selection.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Darwin presented only one figure in the  Origin of Species .
Background image of page 4
Several early observations motivated Darwin’s thinking 1. The age of the earth 2. Extinction and other evidence of change through time 3. Homology and vestigial organs 4. Geographic clustering of similar species
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Darwin’s observations Darwin graduated from Cambridge University in January 1831. In August 1831, he was invited to participate on a voyage around the world on the HMS Beagle .
Background image of page 6
The Beagle’s Voyage (Dec. 1831 - Oct. 1836)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
collections from the Galapagos Islands, he realized that each island had its own distinct species. He also observed that fossil and living organisms in the same geographical region are related to each other and are distinctly different from organisms found in other regions (the “ Law of Succession ”). Darwin’s observations
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/24/2011 for the course BIOL 201 taught by Professor Mitchell during the Spring '07 term at UNC.

Page1 / 37

2-Genetics of Populations (BB)-1 - Overview of the Lecture...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online