{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Exp4_prelab - Experiment 4 Sensors and Chemical Reactions...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Experiment 4 Sensors and Chemical Reactions
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Objectives Define solution and understand its components Identify major classes of reactions Write chemical equations for various reactions Determine an appropriate sensor to monitor the course of a reaction
Image of page 2
Solutions Homogeneous mixtures of two or more substances The solvent in present in greatest abundance In most cases the solvent is water All other substances are solutes (a) A homogeneous sugar solution and (b) Its molecular –level representation. The water molecules are muted so the sugar molecules are easier to see.
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Dissociation When an ionic substance dissolves in water, the solvent pulls the individual ions from the crystal and solvates them This process is called dissociation or dissolution (a) Ionic crystal (b) Ionic crystal dissolving
Image of page 4
Electrolytes Substances that dissociate into ions when dissolved in water. These solutions will conduct electricity. A nonelectrolyte may dissolve in water, but it does not dissociate into ions when it does so. Therefore, it will NOT conduct electricity. (a) Pure water (b) Glucose solution (c) Sodium chloride solution
Image of page 5

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Solubility How easily a solvent can break bonds and form new associations with the solvent. Definition: the concentration of solute in a saturated solution at a specified temperature.
Image of page 6
Solution Chemistry
Image of page 7

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern