Carlyle - Thomas Carlyle(1795-1881 • Born 1795 in...

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Unformatted text preview: Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881) • Born 1795 in Ecclefechan, Dumfriesshire, Scotland; son of a stonemason and devout dissenting Presbyterian • Educated at Annan Academy and the University of Edinburgh for a career as a Presbyterian minister • Rejected the church for a literary career • His first publication, a life of the German poet Schiller, appeared in 1823-24; he published translations of Goethe’s Wilhelm Meister’s Apprenticeship and Wilhelm Meister’s Travels into English in 1824 and 1827 • Married Jane Welsh in 1826; her death in 1866, according to Carlyle, “shattered my whole existence into immeasurable ruins” • Published his famous attack on Utilitarianism, ‘Signs of the Times,’ in 1829 in the Edinburgh Review • In 1833-34, wrote and serially published the seminal work of Victorian fiction, Sartor Resartus (The Tailor Retailored) Battle of Waterloo, June, 1815 British Heroes of the Napoleonic Wars Peterloo Massacre • The “Peterloo Massacre” occurred on August 16, 1819, at St. Peter’s Field, Manchester • A crowd estimated at 50,000 gathered that morning to hear speeches by “radical” proponents of Parliamentary reform • Convinced that the town was in “danger” from the mob, the local magistrates ordered the 15th Hussars (600 men on horseback) to clear the field • The cavalry charged the crowd, killing 11 and wounding 400, including 100 women • The Home Secretary, Viscount Sidmouth, wrote to the magistrates, congratulating them on their action, and Parliament prohibited future mass political gatherings • The organizers of the Manchester protest were tried and jailed for sedition History of the French Revolution (1837) From Sunday afternoon (exclusive of intervals and pauses not final) till Thursday evening, there follow consecutively a Hundred Hours. Which hundred hours are to reckoned with the hours of the Bartholomew Butchery, of the Armagnac Massacres, Sicilian Vespers, or whatsoever is savagest in the annals of this world. Horrible the hour when man’s soul, in its paroxysm, spurns asunder the barriers and rules; and shows what dens and depths in it! For Night and Orcus, as we say, as was long prophesied, have burst forth, here in this Paris, from their subterranean imprisonment: hideous, dim- confused; which it is painful to look on; and yet which cannot, and indeed which should not, be forgotten. September in Paris (pp. 1103-04) The drums are beating: “ Taisez-vous, Silence !” he cries “in a terrible voice, d’une voix terrible .” He mounts the scaffold, not without delay; he is in puce coat, breeches of gray, white stockings. He strips off his coat; stands disclosed in a sleeve- waistcoat of white flannel. The Executioners approach to bind him: he spurns, resists; Abbé Edgeworth has to remind him how the Saviour, in whom men trust, submitted to be bound. His hands are tied, his head bare; the fatal moment is come....
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Carlyle - Thomas Carlyle(1795-1881 • Born 1795 in...

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