Geoffrey_Wace_Layamon

Geoffrey_Wace_Layamon - Geoffrey of Monmouth (d. 1155)...

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Geoffrey of Monmouth (d. 1155) Thought to have been a Benedictine monk of Welsh or Breton ancestry Studied and worked at Oxford Appointed Bishop of St. Asaph circa 1152 His Historia Regum Britanniae (c. 1136) purports to give an historical account of the kings of Britain from Brutus, the great-grandson of Aeneas to Cadwallader (689 AD) The Historia is alleged to be a Latin translation of “a very old book in the British language” (early Welsh), though no such book was known to early chroniclers
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The History of the Kings of Britain Comparing themselves to ancient Rome, the Britons constructed a “foundation myth” based on the legend of Troy Geoffrey begins his history with an account of Brutus, the great-grandson of Rome’s founder, the Trojan prince Aeneas With a band of Trojan exiles, Brutus fled the burning Troy and, directed by the goddess of Diana, sets out for a land “where the sun sets beyond the kingdoms of Gaul” Brutus founded Troynovant (“New Troy”), later called London Geoffrey drew upon earlier Latin chronicles and Welsh oral tradition, including the tales of Arthur and King Lear One-fifth of the Historia is devoted to the Arthur legend, in which he defeats and drives out the Anglo-Saxon invaders At the end of Arthur’s reign, the Saxons return at the behest of Mordred, Arthur’s traitorous nephew
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Le Roman de Brut (1155) Wace (ca. 1100-ca. 1180), a Norman cleric, seemed to have served the Norman court in a secretarial or other official capacity Wace’s translation into French verse of Geoffrey’s Historia , Le Roman de Brut , was dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine, Henry II’s queen, and was designed for a courtly audience that included educated women such as Marie de France Roman ” refers to chronicles in French verse pertaining to the British dynasties of Brutus and the Norman descendants of Rollo, the first Duke of Normandy Wace’s version of the Arthur legend contains the first mention of the Round Table and emphasizes the manners and conduct of the “court” and feudal society Le Roman de Brut retained influence and authority as “true” history well into the fourteenth century
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Arthur was seated on a dais surrounded by counts and kings when a dozen white-haired, very well-dressed men came into the hall in pairs,
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Geoffrey_Wace_Layamon - Geoffrey of Monmouth (d. 1155)...

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