Evol1 - Win Fairchild Teaching: Freshwater Ecology...

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Win Fairchild Teaching: Freshwater Ecology Biostatistical Applications Population Biology Wetlands Background Peace Corps 1969-1972 Ph.D. Univ. Michigan 1980 Research Interests Pond Ecology and Management GIS applications in Biology Freshwater Food Chains
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Why start with Evolution? Has shaped most of the biology described in this course … for example: How did approximately 200 tissue types evolve in humans? Why do members of the same species sometimes kill each other? A good spot to start questioning Very much in the news Approximately half of the American public doesn’t believe in evolution … 0
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How long does it take for evolution to occur? Your choice of Millions of years Thousands of years Hundreds of years A single generation Giant Desert Scorpion Bacterial culture An odd love affair
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Timescale of Evolution Rates of larger scale macroevolution (discussed first) are highly variable (usually measurable in thousands or millions of years) and patterns are debated. Microevolution (discussed later) often takes just a generation (just days for some organisms). 0
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Macroevolution often depends on a “spotty” fossil record e.g., the newly discovered (2004) species Homo floresiensis
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0
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0 The brain and body size of H. floresiensis brain are both much SMALLER than most other recent hominids.
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The Fossil Record How do you age a fossil? Co-occurrence with other fossils of known age Radioisotopes Slowly disappear once the organism dies The less the radioisotope, the older the specimen There are radioisotopes of different elements, with different rates of “decay” (we’ll consider only C 14 ) Fern fossil from Triassic Period (ca. 250 mya), St. Clair, PA 0 Artist’s reconstruction of H. floresiensis (existed until ca. 12,000 years ago)
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http://id-archserve.ucsb.edu/Anth3/Courseware/Chronology/08_Radiocarbon_Dating.html 0 Isotopes ”: Forms of an element having the same number of protons, but different numbers of neutrons . Radioisotope
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Evol1 - Win Fairchild Teaching: Freshwater Ecology...

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