Bio 118 Test #3 Notes 1

Bio 118 Test #3 Notes 1 - Sensory Physiology: 103. What is...

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Sensory Physiology: 103. What is sensory modality? What is sensory intensity? How does each of these work? - sensory modality is a physical phenomenon that can be sensed It is achieved by sending action potentials to particular regions of the brain - sensory intensity is a way to differentiate between a weak and strong stimulus sensory intensity is reflected by the frequency of action potentials fired by sensory neurons. 104.How do stretch-sensitive ion channels contribute to mechanoreceptor function? - these ion channels open when the membrane gets deformed or stretched AP CNS 105.What are baroreceptors? What do they do, and how? Where do you expect to find them? - they are receptors that consist of free nerve endings that branch within the elastic tissues in the wall of a distensible organ, such as a blood vessel or a portion of the respiratory digestive, or urinary tract. - baroreceptors provide information essential to the regulation of autonomic activities by monitoring changes in pressure. - when the pressure changes, the elastic walls of these vessels or tracts expand or recoil. This movement distorts the dendritic branches and alters the rate of action potential generation. 106.What are proprioreceptors? What do they do, and how? Where do you expect to find them? - they monitor the position of joints, the tension in tendons and ligaments, and the state of muscular contraction. - It is made up of 3 parts (free nerve endings, golgi tendon organs, and muscle spindles) - free nerve endings in joint capsules detect pressure, tension and movement at the joint. - golgi tendon organs lie between a skeletal muscle and its tendon and monitor the strain on a tendon during muscle contraction - muscle spindles monitor the length of a skeletal muscle and trigger stretch reflexes - proprioreceptors do not adapt to constant stimulation, and each receptor continuously sends information to the CNS. Most of this information is processed subconsciously; only a small portion of it reaches your conscious awareness. 107. How do chemically-gated ion channels contribute to chemoreceptor function?
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- they open and close to regulate the pH and the carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations of arterial blood 108. Chemoreceptors are found in the CNS, in the carotid arteries, and in the aorta. What do these chemoreceptors monitor? - chemoreceptor cells in the CNS, of the general senses, send their information (taste and smell) to brain stem centers that participate in the autonomic control of respiratory and cardiovascular functions. - chemoreceptors in the carotid bodies and in the aortic bodies monitor the pH and the carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations of arterial blood 109. What are gustatory receptors? What do they do, and how? Where do you expect to find them? - AKA taste receptors, are distributed over the surface of the tongue and adjacent portions of the
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Bio 118 Test #3 Notes 1 - Sensory Physiology: 103. What is...

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