Differential Association

Differential Association - Differential Association Edwin...

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Differential Association Edwin Sutherland
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Differential Association Defined: A person is more likely to engage in criminal behavior if they receive an excess of definitions favorable to committing a crime and in isolation from definitions unfavorable to committing a crime.
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Nine Postulates of Differential Association 1. Criminal behavior is learned 2. Through social interactions 3. In groups 4. Learning includes techniques, drives, motives, attitudes 5. Attitudes, motives, drives are types of favorable definitions of crime 1. One engages in crime because of an excess of definitions favorable for law breaking (Differential Association) 2. Differential association may vary in frequency, duration, priority, and intensity 3. Learning criminal behavior is the same as learning non-criminal behavior 4. Criminal behavior fulfills the same needs as non- criminal behavior
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White Collar Crime Edwin Sutherland (1949)
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Sutherland notice some trends Prior studies of crime mostly concentrated on the lower
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This note was uploaded on 02/27/2011 for the course SYG 2010 taught by Professor Schwabe during the Fall '08 term at FSU.

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Differential Association - Differential Association Edwin...

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