Evaluating_Web_Sources

Evaluating_Web_Sourc - Evaluating Web Sources www.lib.duke.edu/libguide/evaluating_web.htm Can you trust the information you find on the World Wide

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Evaluating Web Sources www.lib.duke.edu/libguide/evaluating_web.htm Can you trust the information you find on the World Wide Web? In most cases, no. But if you understand how to judge the reliability of Web sources, and you’re willing to spend some time doing the judging, you can often uncover material that is trustworthy and useful. Finding credible information on the Web takes some effort because, unlike books and magazines, most of the information on the Internet is not screened by editors or fact- checkers or anyone else before it hits cyberspace. Anyone can say anything on the Web . Thus the watchwords of Web research should be reasonable skepticism . Here are some questions to ask about Web sources to help you assess their credibility. Authority Who wrote the webpage? Look for the author’s name near the top pr the bottom of the webpage. If you can’t find a name, look for a copyright credit © or link to an organization. What are the author’s credentials?
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This note was uploaded on 02/25/2011 for the course PHILO 201 taught by Professor Mizrahi during the Spring '11 term at CUNY Hunter.

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Evaluating_Web_Sourc - Evaluating Web Sources www.lib.duke.edu/libguide/evaluating_web.htm Can you trust the information you find on the World Wide

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