PHILO215_Grading_Criteria

PHILO215_Grading_Criteria - How I Grade Your Papers Its my...

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How I Grade Your Papers It’s my obligation to grade your papers fairly and responsibly. I will also try to return your assignments to you in a timely manner. I’m willing to explain my grade to you, but if you request a grade change, you should be able to explain to me why you deserve another grade. Here are the criteria I’m going to use in grading your papers: Excellent (30) Good (20) Satisfactory (10) Unsatisfactory (5) CONTENT Argument Thesis A clear statement of the main conclusion of the paper. The thesis is obvious, but there is no single clear statement of it. The thesis is present, but must be uncovered or reconstructed from the text of the paper. There is no thesis. Premises Each reason for believing the thesis is made clear, and as much as possible, presented in single statements. It is also clear which premises are to be taken as given, and which will be supported by sub-arguments. The paper provides sub-arguments for controversial premises. If there are sub-arguments, the premises for these are clear, and made in single statements. The premises which are taken as given are at least plausibly true. The premises are all clear, although each may not be presented in a single statement. It is also pretty clear which premises are to be taken as given, and which will be supported by sub- arguments. The paper provides sub-arguments for controversial premises. If there are sub- arguments, the premises for these are clear. The premises which are taken as given are at least plausibly true. The premises must be reconstructed from the text of the paper. It is not made clear which premises are to be taken as given, and which will be supported by sub-arguments. There are no sub- arguments, or, if there are sub- arguments, the premises for these are not made clear. The paper does not provide sub-arguments for controversial premises. The plausibility of the premises which are taken as given is questionable. There are no premises—the paper merely restates the thesis. Or, if there are premises, they are much more likely to be false than true. Support The premises clearly support the thesis, and the author is aware of exactly the kind of support they provide. The argument is either valid as it stands, or, if invalid, the thesis, based on the premises, is likely to be or plausibly true. The premises support the thesis, and the author is aware of the general kind of support they provide. The argument is either valid as it stands, or, if invalid, the thesis, based on the premises, is likely to be or plausibly true. The premises somewhat support the thesis, but the author is not aware of the kind of support they provide. The argument is invalid, and the thesis, based on the premises, is not likely to be or plausibly true. The premises do not support the
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PHILO215_Grading_Criteria - How I Grade Your Papers Its my...

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