Better dead than GM-fed - Better dead than GM-fed? Sep 19th...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Better dead than GM-fed? Sep 19th 2002 From The Econornist print edition Europe's greens are helping to keep Africans hungry SOUTHERN AFRICA'S food crisis is set to be the worst in a decade. Around 14.5m people are dangerously hungry, and many have been reduced to eating wild leaves and pig food . . One might, then, expect food aid to be welcomed. But Zambia is refusing to accept American donations because much of its corn and soya is genetically modified (GM). Zambia's president, Levy Mwanawasa, calls the stuff "poison" and refuses to import it, despite a warning from the UN World Food Programme, on September 16th, that relief supplies in his country could run out in two weeks. Reuters Africans have two reasons for being wary of GM food aid: one silly, one slightly less so. The silly reason is the suggestion that GM foods are a danger to human health . Americans have been chomping GM maize and soyabeans for seven years, without detectable harm. And compared with the clear and immediate danger posed by malnutrition, the possibility of being poisoned by Frankencorn seems rather remote. Food before fine words
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/25/2011 for the course EG 1413 taught by Professor Prof during the Spring '11 term at National University of Singapore.

Page1 / 2

Better dead than GM-fed - Better dead than GM-fed? Sep 19th...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online