intro - CS263 Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks...

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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 1 CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks Matt Welsh
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 2 Welcome to CS263! Wireless networks are everywhere ... This course is all about wireless communications Basics of radio communication The deep guts of how wireless LANs work Specific standards: 802.11, Bluetooth, 802.15.4 With a focus on wireless sensor networks Exciting new technology: small, low-power, wireless devices with sensors You will develop sensor net applications and test them on a real network
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 3 Course Overview Course is roughly divided into three parts: Part 1: Survey of wireless network technologies Radio communication fundamentals, antennas, and propagation Coding schemes, broadband, medium access control Wireless networking standards: 802.11, Bluetooth, and 802.15.4 Part 2: Research papers on wireless networks Ad-hoc routing, TCP/IP in mobile environments Community wireless networks Part 3: Sensor networks (about ½ of the course) Exciting new technology: small, low-power, wireless devices with sensors Applications, operating systems, power management Programming models, querying, network storage, distributed algorithms Localization, time synchronization, and security
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 4 Goals of this class Learn about wireless networks and sensor networks Read research papers on exciting new topics Experiment with a real sensor network Do a research project on your favorite topic Hopefully, publish a paper on your work
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 5 Wireless Networking Overview Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) Wide range of technologies for local, high-data-rate, wireless communications Very different than wide area networking, e.g., cellular, GSM, CDPD, etc. Physical Layer (PHY) How devices transmit binary data over the airwaves Determined by frequency range, transmit power, modulation scheme, etc. Medium Access Control (MAC) How devices share the radio channel and avoid interfering with one another “Listen before you speak” or “Only speak at certain predetermined times” Network Layer How multiple devices in a wireless network talk to each other May involve devices relaying messages to each other ( multihop routing )
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 6 Technology Space Data rate Complexity/power/cost CC1000 Bluetooth 802.15.4 Zigbee 802.11a 802.11b 802.11g 38.4 kbps 250 kbps 720 kbps 11 Mbps 54 Mbps
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 7 802.11 / WiFi The most popular Wireless LAN standard Distribution system Basic service set Access point
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© 2004 Matt Welsh – Harvard University 8 Bluetooth Short-range, moderate data rate wireless link for personal devices 720 Kbps, 10 m range One master and up to 7 slave devices in each Piconet : Master controls transmission schedule of all devices in the Piconet Time Division Multiple Access ( TDMA ): Only one device transmits at a time Frequency hopping used to avoid collisions with other Piconets 79 physical channels of 1 MHz each, hop between channels 1600 times a sec
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